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Datasets For Pharmacy In The Local Environment
There are many free or low-priced datasets available for you to build a more sustainable healthcare practice in your pharmacy.

There are many free or low-priced datasets available for you to build a more sustainable healthcare practice in your pharmacy. If you are unable to access or find time to analyse the data, specialists including your accountant can assist.

1. Dispensary data

Your dispensary is rich with general local area information like the number of patients in each disease category (e.g. patients with diabetes), average ages of patients and what health services from your pharmacy are most commonly accessed by your community. This data will be at a store wide level and not include individual patient data.

2. Over-The-Counter and front of shop

Looking at trends in front of shop sales can help to 'complete the picture' of your patients' health needs in combination with trends from the dispensary.

3. Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS)

contains data by region including average age and wage, population and other statistics that can indicate the kinds of services you should be offering to be relevant to your local community. http://stat.abs.gov.au/itt/r.jsp?databyregion

4. Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW)

Contains national data that can be used to understand the macro-trends in health and how you can build health service offerings that meet local health needs. http://aihw.gov.au/

5. Local doctors

By building good relationships with local GPs you can share information on patient trends and topical interests. This is very useful for ensuring that you are a relevant part of the healthcare network in your area and that you are offering services that the local doctors value and are relevant.

Why does this matter to your pharmacy?

A common obstacle to pharmacy owners and managers to improving pharmacy practice is a lack of understanding of the gap between the services currently offered and what would be most relevant to the local community. By combining the data sources listed above, you are undertaking ‘big data’ analysis to understand this gap. You are doing this by contrasting what is happening both inside and outside your pharmacy - something readily achievable with the data listed above. The definition of insanity is to keep doing the same thing and expecting a different result - try something new by collating some of the information above and redefining what service looks like in your local community; your patients will thank you for it.

* Insight provided by NostraData®.